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Musk Man Origin Story

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Follow @lamebook on instagram for more content!

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glenn
3 days ago
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Waterloo, Canada
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HarlandCorbin
4 days ago
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Hear, hear!

Saudi Arabia Shift To EVs May Be Enhanced By Newly Licensed Women Drivers

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Saudi Arabia shiftEVs in Saudi Arabia may become more popular now that women have received permission to drive
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glenn
7 days ago
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Waterloo, Canada
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Ideas in cars, honking

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I’m catching up with the latest season of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, which I used to enjoy,  but now seems like it should be renamed Rich People in Expensive Cars Getting Coffee and Looking Nervous About Not Having Proper Seatbelts.

There was one great spot in the Dave Chappelle episode, though, that I felt was worth transcribing and sharing. Seinfeld asks Chappelle whether he feels like, knowing he can do a great TV show, he shouldn’t try to do another one.

CHAPPELLE: Sometimes the offering drives. If I [have] an idea, it should drive. It’s like the idea says, “Get in the car.” And I’m like, “Where am I going?” And the idea says, “Don’t worry, I’m driving.” And then you just get there.

SEINFELD: The idea’s driving.

CHAPPELLE: Sometime’s I’m shotgun. Sometimes I’m in the f—ing trunk. The idea takes you where it wants to go.

SEINFELD: That’s great.

CHAPPELLE: And then other times, there’s me, and it’s my ego, like, “I should do something!”

SEINFELD: “I should be driving!”

CHAPPELLE: Yeah.

SEINFELD: That’s not good.

CHAPPELLE: No, ‘cause there’s no idea in the car. It’s just me. That formula doesn’t work.

SEINFELD: If the idea is in the car honking, going, “Let’s go…” It pulls up in front of your house.

CHAPPELLE: That’s exactly right.

SEINFELD: “You’re in your pajamas. Get dressed!”

CHAPPELLE: “I’m not ready!” “You can go like this.” “Where are we going? What are we doing?” “Don’t worry about it. You’ll see.”

Although, there’s another great story about cars and ideas, told by Elizabeth Gilbert:

Tom [Waits], for most of his life, he was pretty much the embodiment of the tormented contemporary modern artist, trying to control and manage and dominate these sort of uncontrollable creative impulses that were totally internalized.

But then he got older, he got calmer, and one day he was driving down the freeway in Los Angeles, and this is when it all changed for him. And he’s speeding along, and all of a sudden he hears this little fragment of melody, that comes into his head as inspiration often comes, elusive and tantalizing, and he wants it, it’s gorgeous, and he longs for it, but he has no way to get it. He doesn’t have a piece of paper, or a pencil, or a tape recorder.

So he starts to feel all of that old anxiety start to rise in him like, “I’m going to lose this thing, and I’ll be be haunted by this song forever. I’m not good enough, and I can’t do it.” And instead of panicking, he just stopped. He just stopped that whole mental process and he did something completely novel. He just looked up at the sky, and he said, “Excuse me, can you not see that I’m driving?”

“Do I look like I can write down a song right now? If you really want to exist, come back at a more opportune moment when I can take care of you. Otherwise, go bother somebody else today. Go bother Leonard Cohen.”

And his whole work process changed after that. Not the work, the work was still oftentimes as dark as ever. But the process, and the heavy anxiety around it was released when he took the genie, the genius out of him where it was causing nothing but trouble, and released it back where it came from, and realized that this didn’t have to be this internalized, tormented thing.

Gilbert interviewed Waits in 2002 and he elaborated on his attitude:

“Kids are always working on songs and throwing them away, like little origami things or paper airplanes. They don’t care if they lose it; they’ll just make another one.” This openness is what every artist needs. Be ready to receive the inspiration when it comes; be ready to let it go when it vanishes. He believes that if a song “really wants to be written down, it’ll stick in my head. If it wasn’t interesting enough for me to remember it, well, it can just move along and go get in someone else’s song.” “Some songs,” he has learned, “don’t want to be recorded.” You can’t wrestle with them or you’ll only scare them off more. Trying to capture them sometimes “is trying to trap birds.” Fortunately, he says, other songs come easy, like “digging potatoes out of the ground.” Others are sticky and weird, like “gum found under an old table.” Clumsy and uncooperative songs may only be useful “to cut up as bait and use ’em to catch other songs.” Of course, the best songs of all are those that enter you “like dreams taken through a straw.’ In those moments, all you can be, Waits says, is grateful.

Brian Eno puts it in terms of surrender and control:

On one side of Eno’s scale diagram, he writes “control”; on the other “surrender”. “We’ve tended to dignify the controlling end of the spectrum,” he says. “We have Nobel prizes for that end.” His idea is that control is what we generally believe the greats – Shakespeare, Picasso, Einstein, Wagner – were about. Such people, the argument goes, controlled their chosen fields, working in isolation, never needing any creative input from others. As for surrender, that idea has become debased: it’s come to mean what the rest of us do when confronted by a work of genius. “We’ve tended to think of the surrender end as a luxury, a nice thing you add to your life when you’ve done the serious work of getting a job, getting your pension sorted out. I’m saying that’s all wrong.”

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glenn
7 days ago
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Love this idea of the blend of control and surrender. Applies to all kinds of areas of your life.
Waterloo, Canada
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Books I read in 1H 2018

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2018 turned out to be a great year for knowledge building and reading a wide variety of topics from various books. I took a conscientious decision in 2017 to quit some social media platforms such as Facebook and Instagram and whittling away overusage of Twitter. I still see a lot of value in Twitter, so I find it hard to quit completely — especially since I get to connect with some brilliant people and have/follow interesting ideas and conversations in an easily digestable format.

In addition to quitting social media, I made a decision to reduce my consumption of news. Most of today’s news – be it financial media, political media etc is nothing but drivel that generates excessive noise in my mind, and I wanted to get rid of that from my head.  These little changes opened up so much time; allowing me to do more of what I wanted to do for the past few years: read more books.

Sure enough, I have made tremendous progress so far in 2018 and decided to provide a half year update on what I’ve been reading. Here’s a list of books I read in 2018 and my short take on each of these.

  1. Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari – Probably the best book I read so far this year. There are so many snippets that stand out from this book that apply to various aspects of life. This book has definitely left a lasting impression on me and I still go back a read some passages over as the author presents a unique perspective on a commonly told stories by humans – such as money, religion, politics etc. The book does a fantastic job of walking through various phases of our evolution, broadly classified into Cognitive Revolution, Agricultural Revolution, and the Scientific Revolution. I highly recommend reading it if you haven’t read it yet. Verdict: ★★★★★
  2. Fooled by Randomness by Nassim Taleb – Taleb does a remarkable job putting himself on the pedestal and convincing himself that he is god’s gift to humanity. I knew of this before I read the book; from what I’ve read/heard from people who have met him and I quote: “He is stark raving bonkers”. The book shows this behavior — I didn’t really enjoy it as much as I thought I would as the author simply diverges into meaningless rants. But I didn’t let that stop me from trying to grasp some nuggets of information that I could gather from this book. A few interesting points about randomness and decision making that were good though. Verdict: ★★
  3. The Case Against Sugar by Gary Taubes – This is the first Gary Taubes book I read. His books have known to be a bit of a journey down a rabbit hole and sure enough, there were sections of the book that seemed to delve deeper than I expected. Nonetheless I thought it was a decent read and well researched. The book walks you through the history of sugar cultivation during the late middle ages and through usage over various centuries, although majority of the books spends time on the 20th century American  medicine and how the culture of sugar found its deep roots in all our present day diets. A pretty decent read if you are interested in diets, health and longevity. Verdict: ★★★
  4. Robot-Proof: Higher Education in the Age of Artificial Intelligence by Joseph Aoun – Not the best book I read this year. Most of the book talks about the usual jobs disappearing and automated over the coming years. I wasn’t too impressed with the simplistic and slightly repetitive writing. Verdict: ★
  5. The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle – This was a great book and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The author walks through the process of how skills and talents are developed; about how Myelin plays a central role in our nervous system to develop talent. While the biology can be a bit complex, the author did an amazing job to make it easily understandable and presentable to a layman like me. Highly recommended. Verdict: ★★★★
  6. Surely You Are Joking, Mr. Feynman by Richard Feynman – This was an interesting book. Normally I don’t read biographies/memoirs, but this one came highly recommended from multiple sources, so I decided to give it a try. The book is a collection of short stories and personal experiences of Dr. Feynman. While the first 1/3 of the book was not as interesting, the book caught my attention when Dr Feynman recalled stories from the days of the Manhattan project. There was a lot about him that I didn’t know and it was a good fun read. Verdict: ★★★½
  7. How Google Works by Eric Schmidt & Jonathan Rosenberg – This was a business book about the company culture at Google, a company that I am always fascinated by. The engineers who work and form the company are legendary in the industry, but it was good to read from the vantage point of management and the leadership team. Lot of the culture has now percolated to the rest of the tech industry, but how the company was initially run contributed massively to drive Google to the top of the world in becoming one of the most successful companies, in an extremely short period of time. Verdict: ★★★★
  8. Factfulness by Hans Rosling, Anna Rosling Ronnlund, and Ola Rosling – Definitely one of the top books of the year. It is an important book to read, albeit a bit dry, but that is the point of the book — to simply look at the facts without getting emotionally swayed by say, the media overplaying a particular angle to a story. This is the book that Bill Gates recently bought the rights to distribute a free copy to every American university graduate this year. In a nutshell, this book implores everyone to learn how to look and evaluate statistics/facts and not let either pre-conceived or outdated information influence their world view. The authors start the book with a few simple questions of the status of the world and then presents the data to show that most polls of high ranking professionals, businessmen, policy & decision makers did worse than randomized results generated by banana picking chimpanzees! In addition, there are some good resources to explore online such as Dollar Street at Gapminder. Be sure to check it out. Verdict: ★★★★★
  9. The Obesity Code by Dr. Jason Fung – This is an easy & quick read. Dr Fung does a fantastic job of getting to the bottom of the obesity crisis and how conventional medicine over the past 3-4 decades has got it completely wrong on inconclusive and unproven data. This book delves into how the body processes the food we eat, how insulin plays a central role, not just in causing obesity, but also the fact that insulin resistance is the root cause for major chronic diseases such as Type 2 Diabetes. It was an eye opener on understanding various aspects of some major diseases in an easily presentable way. Verdict: ★★★★

Those are the 9 books I have read so far in the first half of 2018. I am pretty happy with the progress and doing far better than I had imagined. I didn’t really have a goal in mind as I am not aiming for the high quantity of books that I want to read for the year. I am just enjoying reading these books that I find interesting and will hopefully expand my knowledge horizon over the coming years.

Have you read any interesting books lately? What should I read next? Leave comments below with your recommendations.

The post Books I read in 1H 2018 appeared first on Roadmap2Retire.

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glenn
8 days ago
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I need to spend more time this year reading
Waterloo, Canada
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“I Was Devastated”: Tim Berners-Lee, the Man Who Created the World Wide Web, Has...

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“I Was Devastated”: Tim Berners-Lee, the Man Who Created the World Wide Web, Has Some Regrets | Vanity Fair

“The power of the Web wasn’t taken or stolen. We, collectively, by the billions, gave it away with every signed user agreement and intimate moment shared with technology.”

This widely linked to article is widely linked to for a reason. It’s important.

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glenn
10 days ago
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Good article. Link to SOLID project: https://solid.mit.edu
Waterloo, Canada
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On This Occasion of Steve Ditko’s Death

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Vulture:

For a recluse, Steve Ditko is surprisingly easy to locate. You won’t see him in public: Despite being one of the most important figures in comics history, the most recent published photograph of the 89-year-old was taken about 50 years ago. And though his name appears prominently as “co-creator” in the credits of Marvel Studios’ Doctor Strange — which has already grossed more than $490 million worldwide — he has never been on a red carpet, or appeared on TV or radio. But if you ask within the comics community, you can readily find the location and phone number of his Manhattan studio. The man’s around. It’s putting that contact information to good use that’s difficult.

I needed to share this incredible piece by Abraham Riesman.

Really underlines why Ditko stood out among the other 60’s-era Marvel names.

Truly one of a kind, for better or worse.

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glenn
10 days ago
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Waterloo, Canada
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