Entrepreneur, husband, Dad, and technology geek all contained within a single human being.
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What I like about the trees is howThey do not talk about the failure of their pa...

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What I like about the trees is how
They do not talk about the failure of their parents
And what I like about the grasses is that
They are not grasses in recovery
And what I like about the flowers is
That they are not flowers in need of empowerment or validation. They sway
Upon their thorny stems
As if whatever was about to happen next tonight
was sure to be completely interesting
 - Tony Hoagland
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glenn
1 day ago
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Waterloo, Canada
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Play around with this trippy Julia set fractal

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Julia Set Fractal

Yay! It’s Fractal Friday! (It’s not, I just made that up.) But anyway, courtesy of Christopher Night, you can play around with this Julia set fractal. It works in a desktop browser (by moving the mouse) or on your phone (by dragging your finger).

The Julia set, if you don’t remember, goes thusly: Let f(z) be a complex rational function from the plane into itself, that is, f(z)=p(z)/q(z) f(z)=p(z)/q(z), where p(z) and q(z) are complex polynomials. Then there is a finite number of open sets F1, …, Fr, that are left invariant by f(z) which, uh, is um… yay! Fractal Friday! The colors are so pretty!

Tags: Christopher Night   design   fractals   mathematics
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glenn
2 days ago
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c = -0.762 + 0.097i
Waterloo, Canada
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vintagegeekculture:Computer t-shirts from the 1980s.

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vintagegeekculture:

Computer t-shirts from the 1980s.

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fxer
3 days ago
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I want one that just says COMPUTER FONT
Bend, Oregon
glenn
3 days ago
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have you hugged your programmer today?
Waterloo, Canada
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Scaling Back

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For a long time I've wrestled with a number of different terminal apps and tools in the hope of improving my productivity at the command line. Initially I used iTerm2, a terminal emulator for macOS, as my preferred terminal app. Then I also started using tmux, a terminal multiplexer, on top of that. Then came along Vim, the open source text editor, and I started using that as well.

This was the first time in a long time that I had started using all three again. The benefit of using this combination of tools is that I could run both my command line and text editor within a single app and very rarely have to switch away from it.

One huge pain point I couldn't get round though was the simple act of copying and pasting text between Vim and other apps. Despite a number of attempts to get it working I've decided to call it a day on this trio of tools.

  • Vim is a great text editor, but to be honest I'm faster coding with Sublime Text or even Atom for that fact. Yes, I use the mouse and yes I want to have features and plugins that don't require me to mess about with command line.
  • tmux is great for managing different command line sessions within a single terminal emulator but I don't think it's a necessity. Lately I've been doing away with split panes and using multiple tabs.
  • Which brings me to iTerm2. As great an application as it is, there's nothing that it offers that I can't get from Apple's own terminal emulator, Terminal.

So I stopped using Vim, tmux and iTerm2 and fell back to using Terminal and Sublime Text.

I've went full circle from starting with the basics, adding more tools to the stack, before reducing the tools I need for the terminal right down to the absolute basics. One app for the terminal and one app for editing source code.

I can see the case for using tools like tmux and Vim. Maybe you spend most of your day in a terminal as a system administrator and you're faster with Vim. Maybe you need to manage multiple servers on a daily basis so splitting panes in tmux suits your line of work. I get it. I understand why these tools exist and why you would use them.

Sometimes though scaling back is just as much a benefit.

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fxer
2 days ago
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I'm a sysadmin and could have written this exact same post.
Bend, Oregon
glenn
3 days ago
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I've gone through this exact same cycle
Waterloo, Canada
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1 public comment
AaronPresley
2 days ago
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Agree with most of this, but iTerm2 is a permanent fixture for me. Their Saved Window Arrangement feature (while being hard to find and annoying to setup) is a life saver and I use it 10+ times per day when jumping between projects. Don't know how I lived without it.
Portland, OR
DMack
2 days ago
is iTerm2 the only good alternative to the native Terminal in OSX?
AaronPresley
2 days ago
¯\_(ツ)_/¯ It is as far as I've found, not that I've done extensive searching.
DMack
2 days ago
I did a medium-extensive search a couple of years ago when I found the native terminal woefully inadequate. I was surprised at the time that even W****ws has more/nicer options for SSH clients

Get out now

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what are you hoping to express if all you see is four walls - flee the office - to pick up a signal cut off mobile service - don't die simply disappear a while
“GET OUT NOW. Not just outside, but beyond the trap of the programmed electronic age so gently closing around so many people…. Go outside, move deliberately, then relax, slow down, look around. Do not jog. Do not run…. Instead pay attention to everything that abuts the rural road, the city street, the suburban boulevard. Walk. Stroll. Saunter. Ride a bike, and coast along a lot. Explore…. Abandon, even momentarily, the sleek modern technology that consumes so much time and money now…. Go outside and walk a bit, long enough to forget programming, long enough to take in and record new surroundings…. Flex the mind, a little at first, then a lot. Savor something special. Enjoy the best-kept secret around—the ordinary, everyday landscape that rewards any explorer, that touches any explorer with magic…all of it is free for the taking, for the taking in. Take it. take it in, take in more every weekend, every day, and quickly it becomes the theater that intrigues, relaxes, fascinates, seduces, and above all expands any mind focused on it. Outside lies utterly ordinary space open to any casual explorer willing to find the extraordinary. Outside lies unprogrammed awareness that at times becomes directed serendipity. Outside lies magic.”
John Stilgoe, Outside Lies Magic

[Image above: a page from Show Your Work!]

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glenn
3 days ago
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Waterloo, Canada
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It’s you.

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It’s you.

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glenn
7 days ago
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Waterloo, Canada
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